Children's Books in the Children's Room of the Main Library

What was the most challenged book of 2012?

Posted on September 24, 2013 at 10:16 AM

ALA Freadom to Read

Every year, the American Library Association organizes Banned Books Week, which is a celebration of the freedom to read. Since its inception in 1982, Banned Books Week has reminded us that while not every book is intended for every reader, each of us has the right to decide for ourselves what to read, listen to, or view.

The most challenged and/or restricted reading materials have been books for children. However, challenges are not simply an expression of a point of view; but they are an attempt to remove materials from public use, thereby restricting the access of others. Even if the motivation to ban or challenge a book is well intentioned, the outcome can be detrimental. Censorship denies our freedom as individuals to choose and think for ourselves. For children, decisions about what books to read should be made by the people who know them best—their parents!

In support of the right to choose books freely for ourselves, think about checking out some of the most heavely banned books. In 2012, the top ten books that were challenged include:

  1. Captain Underpants coverCaptain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey 
  2. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie 
  3. Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher 
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E. L. James
  5. And Tango Makes Three, by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson
  6. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
  8. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz 
  9. The Glass Castle, by Jeanette Walls 
  10. Beloved, by Toni Morrison

View more frequently challenged books by decade.



Category: News

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Written by Emily Marshall

Hey everyone! I’m Emily Marshall. As the Community Relations Manager for WCPL, I’m usually sitting in front of my computer creating posters in Photoshop, planning library programs, or teaching computer classes. In my spare time, I enjoy reading teen books, watching way too much TV, traveling, playing board games, and trying to convince people that cheesy Hallmark Channel and ABC Family original movies aren't “that bad.” I also love messages, so feel free to email me at emarshall(at)wellscolibrary.org.

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